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  • Magnesium Citrate - 120 Capsules
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    Magnesium Citrate - 120 Capsules

    GN Laboratories

    Highly dosed magnesium in its most bioavailable form for optimal absorption! Product Highlights Contains the magnesium dosage form with...

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  • Magnesium Bisglycinate - 120 Capsules
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    Magnesium Bisglycinate - 120 Capsules

    Gods Rage

    Magnesium Bisglycinate - S.P.Q.R Magnesium is involved in over 300 processes in the human organism. It supports your immune system and takes...

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  • Magnesium Citrate - 250g
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    Magnesium Citrate - 250g

    GN Laboratories

    Magnesium Citrate Powder Health Line Highly dosed magnesium in its most bioavailable form for optimal absorption! Product Highlights Contains...

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  • Magnesium Bisglycinate - 120 Capsules
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    Magnesium Bisglycinate - 120 Capsules

    Big Zone

    Magnesium is a mineral that is involved in numerous metabolic processes. A deficiency can be manifested, for example, by fatigue or muscle c...

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  • Magnesium citrate - 240g
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    Magnesium citrate - 240g

    PEAK

    Peak Magnesium Citrate Bioavailable Magnesium Citrate!!! Bioavailable Magnesium Citrate 250 mg Magnesium per serving Vitamin B6 (100% RDA) Vitamin C...

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  • Calcium Magnesium - 90 Tablets
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    Calcium Magnesium - 90 Tablets

    SCITEC Nutrition

    Mineral formula Calcium and magnesium are important minerals contained in our formula with a ratio of 2:1. The contents...

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  • Magnesium + Chelate - 60 capsules
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    Magnesium + Chelate - 60 capsules

    Biotech USA

    Magnesium + Chelate - Biotech USA With 250 mg of magnesium per serving with Mg-bisglizinate good usable formula Who is it recommended for? Those who...

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  • Magnesium Citrate - 120 Tablets
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    Magnesium Citrate - 120 Tablets

    Blackline 2.0

    Magnesium for you, in the best form Magnesium is a vital mineral and supports you and your body in over 300 active metabolic...

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  • Magnesium Bisglycinate Health+ - 120 Capsules
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    Magnesium Bisglycinate Health+ - 120 Capsules

    Zec+

    HEALTH+ Magnesium Bisglycinate is a dietary supplement that is taken as a capsule ideally shortly before bedtime The magnesi...

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  • ZMB6 - 60 capsules
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    ZMB6 - 60 capsules

    SCITEC Nutrition

    Zinc, Magnesium & Vitamin B6 ZMB6 is an essential mineral/vitamin combination that provides zinc, magnesium and vitamin B6. Zinc and magnesi...

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  • Magnesium Complex - 120 capsules
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    Magnesium Complex - 120 capsules

    Weider

    Ideal dietary supplement for people with increased magnesium needs Magnesium is an essential mineral necessary for all organisms, including...

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  • ZMB - 60 capsules
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    ZMB - 60 capsules

    Biotech USA

    Why do we recommend ZMB capsules? To regulate hormone activity1 To maintain normal levels of testosterone in the blood2 To reduce...

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  • Praetorian Magnesium Citrate - 250g
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    Praetorian Magnesium Citrate - 250g

    Gods Rage

    If you want to belong to the elite of fighters against the cold steel, the relentless weights and all the enemies of the Empire, then your...

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  • Chela-Mag B6 - 30 capsules
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    Chela-Mag B6 - 30 capsules

    Olimp Sport Nutrition

    Chela-Mag-B6® is a dietary supplement containing magnesium in the form of amino acid chelate ALBION®, which is enriched with vitamin B6....

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Magnesium is a silvery-white light metal that oxidizes in air to silver-gray magnesium oxide. It has the atomic number 12, the chemical symbol Mg, and is assigned to the alkaline earth metals in the periodic table of the elements. It was discovered and described as an element in 1755 by the English chemist Joseph Black (1728- 1799). The element was named after the Greek peninsula Magnesia. It occurs, for example, in the dolomite rock of the Dolomites as calcium magnesium carbonate. In seawater, about 15% of the salts are dissolved in the form of magnesium chloride. Magnesium is hardly used in engineering due to its low hardness and high susceptibility to corrosion. In contrast, magnesium alloys, for example with aluminum, are characterized by low density and thus low weight, as well as high strength and corrosion resistance. Such alloys are increasingly being used in the construction of motor vehicles, aircraft and ships. For the construction of the Saturn V rocket, for example, NASA used a magnesium alloy containing around 85% magnesium, 14% lithium and 1% aluminum. It is the eighth most abundant element in the earth's crust. However, because of its chemically high reactivity, it does not occur in pure form, but only in various compounds.

In medicine, magnesium is considered a bulk element. An adult contains an average of 25 grams of magnesium in his body. More than half of this magnesium is stored in the bones, most of the remainder in the cell interior, and only about 1% is dissolved in the blood (1). Magnesium has physiological functions in bone formation and muscle metabolism. Incidentally, the mineral (taken in time) is considered an insider tip against the "hangover", i.e. the headache the day after a night of drinking.

Magnesium is also important in medicine and pharmacy as a component of some antacids, i.e. drugs to combat excessive stomach acid, and some laxatives.

Functions in the body

Alongside calcium, to which it acts as a physiological counterpart, magnesium plays a decisive role in the formation and maintenance of the skeletal system and teeth, and stabilizes the inner cellular skeleton of the cells. It also controls muscle and nerve functions by regulating muscle contraction, among other things, through the magnesium concentration. To date, about 300 enzymes are known that require the "cooperation" of magnesium for their activity. In energy metabolism in particular, the positively charged magnesium ion (Mg2+) is needed to stabilize the negatively charged phosphate ions (PO43-) in the molecule ATP (adenosine triphosphate). ATP, together with ADP (adenosine diphosphate), is a key substance in biological energy transfer.

Magnesium is involved in over 600 reactions in the human body. These include, among others (2):

  • Energy supply: Magnesium is needed for the conversion of food into energy.
  • Protein building: Magnesium is needed for the building of body proteins from amino acids.
  • Gene maintenance: Magnesium is needed for the production and repair of DNA and RNA.
  • Muscle movements: Magnesium is part of the contraction and relaxation of muscles.
  • Regulation of the nervous system: Magnesium helps regulate neurotransmitters that carry messages to the brain and nervous system.

Potential health benefits of magnesium

Magnesium has a variety of health benefits. Here is a brief overview of some of them, including the underlying scientific research.

Magnesium can increase training performance

Magnesium plays an important role in exercise performance. During exercise, the body needs up to 10-20% more magnesium than at rest, depending on the activity performed (4). Magnesium helps transport blood to the muscles and remove lactate from the muscles, which can accumulate in the muscles during exercise and cause pain (5).

Studies have shown that magnesium supplementation can enhance exercise performance in athletes, the elderly, and people with chronic diseases (6, 7, 8). In one study, volleyball players who took 250 mg of magnesium daily improved their jumps and arm movements (9).

In another study, athletes who supplemented with magnesium for four weeks achieved better times in running, swimming and cycling during a triathlon. They also experienced reductions in insulin levels and levels of stress hormones (10). However, the study evidence is mixed. Other studies found no benefits of magnesium supplements in athletes with normal magnesium levels (11, 12).

Summary: Magnesium supplements have been shown to increase exercise performance in some studies, but the body of research is mixed.

Magnesium can fight depression

Magnesium plays a critical role in brain function and mood, and low magnesium levels have been associated with an increased risk of depression (13, 14). An analysis of more than 8,800 people found that people under age 65 with the lowest magnesium levels had a 22% higher risk of depression (14). Some experts believe that the low magnesium levels in the modern diet may be causing many cases of depression and mental illness (16). However, others highlight the need for further research in this area (16).

Regardless, supplementation with this mineral could help reduce symptoms of depression, and in some cases the results can be dramatic (15, 17). In a controlled study of elderly subjects suffering from depression, 450 mg of magnesium per day was as effective in improving mood as a pharmaceutical antidepressant (17).

Summary: There may be a link between depression and a magnesium deficiency. Supplementation with magnesium could reduce symptoms of depression in some people.

Magnesium may also be beneficial for people suffering from type 2 diabetes

Studies suggest that 48% of people with type 2 diabetes have low blood magnesium levels. This may impair the ability of insulin to keep blood glucose levels under control (1, 18).

In addition to this, studies suggest that people with low magnesium intakes have a higher risk of developing diabetes (19, 20). One study that followed more than 4,000 people over a 20-year period found that subjects with the highest magnesium intake had a 47% lower risk of developing diabetes (21). Another study showed that people with type 2 diabetes who received high daily magnesium doses had a significant improvement in blood glucose levels and hemoglobin A1c levels compared to a control group (22).

However, these effects may depend on how much magnesium is consumed in the diet. In another study, magnesium supplementation did not improve blood glucose or insulin levels in people who were not deficient in magnesium (23).

Summary: People who consume the greatest amount of magnesium have a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. In addition, magnesium supplements have been shown to lower blood glucose levels in some people.

Magnesium can lower blood pressure

Studies show that magnesium intake can lower blood pressure (24, 25, 26). In one study, subjects who consumed 450 mg of magnesium per day experienced a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (27).

However, it could be that these effects are only seen in people who have high blood pressure. Another study concluded that magnesium lowered blood pressure in subjects with high blood pressure but had no effect in people with normal blood pressure (28).

Summary: Magnesium can help lower blood pressure in people with high blood pressure, but it does not seem to have the same effect in people with normal blood pressure.

Magnesium has anti-inflammatory benefits

Low magnesium levels are associated with chronic inflammation, which is a driving force in aging, the development of obesity, and chronic disease (29, 30, 31).

In one study, it was observed that children with the lowest magnesium levels had the highest levels of the inflammatory marker CRP. They also had higher blood glucose levels, higher insulin levels and higher triglyceride levels (32).

Magnesium supplements can lower CRP levels and other markers of inflammation in older adults, overweight people, and people suffering from prediabetes (33, 34, 35). In the same way, magn

Summary: Magnesium has been shown to help fight inflammation. It reduces levels of the inflammatory marker CRP and provides numerous other benefits.

Magnesium can help prevent migraine attacks

Migraine headaches are painful and disabling. There is often additional nausea, vomiting, and hypersensitivity to light and noise. Some scientists believe that people who suffer from migraines are more likely than others to be deficient in magnesium (36).

In fact, recent encouraging studies suggest that magnesium may help prevent and even treat migraine attacks (37, 38). In one study, supplementation with 1 gram of magnesium provided faster and more effective relief of migraine attacks in adults than did ordinary medicine (39).

In addition to this, magnesium-rich foods could help reduce migraine symptoms (40).

Summary: People who regularly suffer from migraines may have low magnesium levels. Some studies show that supplementation with this mineral could provide relief for migraine.

Magnesium can reduce insulin resistance

Insulin resistance is one of the leading causes of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. It is characterized by an impaired ability of muscle and liver cells to properly absorb sugar from the bloodstream. Magnesium plays an important role in this process and many people suffering from metabolic syndrome are deficient in magnesium (3).

In addition to this, the high insulin levels that accompany insulin resistance lead to a loss of magnesium through the urine, which further lowers magnesium levels in the body (41).

Fortunately, increasing magnesium intake may help (42, 43, 44). One study found that supplementation with this mineral reduced insulin resistance and blood glucose levels even in people with normal blood levels (45).

Summary: Magnesium supplements may improve insulin resistance in people suffering from metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes.

Magnesium can relieve PMS symptoms

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is one of the most common disorders in women of childbearing age. Symptoms include water retention, abdominal cramps, fatigue and irritability.

Interestingly, magnesium has been shown to improve mood, reduce water retention, and relieve other PMS symptoms (46, 47).

Summary: Magnesium supplements have been shown to reduce symptoms that may occur in women with PMS.

Foods containing magnesium

In general, it can be stated that whole grain products, raw vegetables, nuts and chocolate are rich in magnesium. Examples of foods particularly rich in magnesium are sunflower seeds (420 mg/100 g), sesame seeds (370 mg/100 g), unhusked rice (160 mg/100 g), wheat germ (250 mg/100 g), chocolate (140 mg/100 g), and oatmeal (with 140 mg/100 g). One should also pay attention to a high magnesium content when choosing mineral water. Good mineral waters can contain over 80 mg of magnesium per liter.

The following foods are also excellent sources of magnesium:

  • Pumpkin seeds: 46% of the daily requirement in a quarter cup (16 grams).
  • Spinach, cooked: 39% of the daily requirement per cup (180 grams
  • Chard vegetables, cooked: 38% of the daily requirement per cup (175 grams).
  • Dark chocolate (70-85% cocoa): 33% of the daily requirement per 100 grams.
  • Black beans: 30% of the daily requirement per cup (172 grams)
  • Quinoa, cooked: 33% of the daily requirement per cup (185 grams)
  • Halibut: 27% of the daily requirement per 100 grams
  • Almonds: 25% of the daily requirement in a quarter cup (24 grams).
  • Cashews: 25% of the daily requirement in a quarter cup (30 grams).
  • Mackerel 19% of the daily requirement per 100 grams
  • Avocado: 15% of the daily requirement in a medium-sized avocado (200 grams).
  • Salmon: 9% of the daily requirement per 100 grams

Magnesium Supplements

People suffering from a medical condition should discuss taking magnesium supplements with their doctor in advance. Even though magnesium supplements are generally well tolerated, they may not be safe and harmless for people taking certain diuretics, heart medications or antibiotics.

Supplement forms of magnesium. Those that can be absorbed well by the body include citrates, glycinates, orotates and carbonates.

Deficiency symptoms, hypomagnesemia

Normal values are given for magnesium. These are 0.8 to 1.1 mmol/l when magnesium is determined in plasma or serum. Below 0.8 mmol/l, hypomagnesemia is present, with clear symptoms, such as increased excitability of the skeletal muscles and central nervous system, only appearing above approx. 0.4 mmol/l. Hypomagnesemia is often accompanied by hypocalcemia, i.e. calcium deficiency.

Unfortunately, studies suggest that about 50% of all people in the U.S. and Europe consume less than the daily recommended amount of magnesium (1, 3).

A magnesium deficiency can manifest itself in a number of ways:

  • Muscle and calf cramps
  • restlessness, nervousness, dizziness, lack of concentration
  • Headache, migraine
  • Disturbances of the heart: heart palpitations, spasms of the heart muscles up to rhythm disturbances and heart pain.
  • gastrointestinal problems, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, cramps

Reasons for magnesium deficiency:

  • chronic alcoholism
  • Laxative abuse
  • Chronic diarrhea or surgical removal of bowel segments
  • Increased renal (via the kidneys) excretion of magnesium (e.g., in hyperaldosteronism, diabetics, or prolonged use of diuretics).

Overdose, hypermagnesemia and poisoning

In healthy people, there are usually no overdoses; too much magnesium absorbed is excreted. In the case of reduced kidney function, however, an excess of magnesium can occur, especially if medicines containing magnesium, such as antacids or laxatives, are taken.

Normal values for magnesium in plasma or serum range from 0.8 to 1.1 mmol/l. The symptoms of an overdose develop depending on the magnesium concentration in the blood. For example, diarrhea and reduced excitability of the muscles and central nervous system can occur from about 2 mmol/l. At magnesium concentrations above 5 mmol/l, paralysis, impaired excitation and propagation to the heart, and a drop in blood pressure occur. Furthermore, respiratory depression, nausea and vomiting may occur. In the case of an extreme overdose of magnesium, respiratory and cardiac arrest may occur.

Magnesium poisoning

In the case of magnesium poisoning, the symptoms already described for hypermagnesemia occur. Treatment of magnesium poisoning consists of gastric lavage or and intravenous injection with 10% calcium gluconate solution or 0.5 to 1 mg neostigmine. Furthermore, respiratory support or stabilization of the circulation may be required.

Demand

The need for magnesium is specified by the German Society for Nutrition for adolescents from the age of 16 and adults with 300-400 mg daily. It should be noted that men, because of their larger skeletal mass, require somewhat more than women. For children up to 4 years, 80 mg and up to 15 years 120-300 mg are recommended.

Pregnant women should take around 350 mg, nursing women around 390 mg daily. In the last months of pregnancy, magnesium is also often prescribed by gynecologists to inhibit premature labor. The following groups of people may also have an additional need for magnesium: Athletes, who lose a lot of magnesium through sweat; diabetics, who excrete more magnesium through their urine; alcoholics; and the elderly, who often do not drink enough. Furthermore, taking some medicines can be a reason for an increased magnesium requirement. Examples include the following drugs: Aminoglycosides, Ciclosporin, oral contraceptives, laxatives, glucocorticoids, diuretics, etc. In addition, people with heart disease may have an increased need for magnesium, but an additional intake of magnesium preparations should always be discussed with the treating physician by persons with heart disease. It is assumed that the daily requirement of magnesium should be approximately covered by a normal diet. Magnesium is much better absorbed by the body in organic compounds (such as magnesium citrate, aspartate and glutamate) than in inorganic compounds (magnesium carbonate, magnesium oxide). Short-term bottlenecks in magnesium intake are bridged by the magnesium reserves in the bones. However, deficiencies can occur in the case of illness, malnutrition or also frequently in older people.

Demand in sport

Although it is known that a deficiency of this mineral that severely impairs physical performance is quite common, many athletes still take in too little magnesium. Studies of competitive athletes have shown that only a sufficient magnesium supply in the body enables effective training. Compared to normal people, athletes certainly have a higher magnesium requirement. If we also consider that a magnesium deficiency is fairly widespread in the population, it becomes clear that competitive athletes in particular can benefit from magnesium supplementation. The likelihood of a deficiency in athletes is further increased by magnesium losses through sweat. Accordingly, two studies could show that magnesium supplementation has a positive effect on both untrained and trained individuals. A recommended magnesium dose is 6mg per kilo of body weight per day, i.e. approx. 500mg of a magnesium preparation for an athlete weighing 80 kilos.

Safety and side effects

Magnesium is probably safe and harmless for most people when taken orally or with proper use of prescription injectable products. In some people, magnesium can cause stomach upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and other side effects.

Dosages below 350 mg of magnesium per day are safe and harmless for most adults. High dosages can result in excessive accumulation of magnesium in the body, which can cause serious side effects including irregular heartbeat, low blood pressure, confusion, slow breathing, coma and death.

Precautions and warnings

Pregnancy and Lactation: Magnesium is probably safe and harmless for pregnant and lactating women when taken in the range of recommended amounts. These amounts depend on the age of the woman. Pregnant and lactating women should consult their physician to find out what amounts are right for them.

Heart Block: High doses of magnesium, typically administered intravenously, should not be given to people suffering from heart block.

Kidney problems such as kidney failure: Kidneys that do not function well have trouble excreting magnesium. Taking extra magnesium could result in magnesium accumulation in the body, which can reach dangerous levels. For this reason, you should not take magnesium if you suffer from kidney problems.

Interactions of magnesium with the following medications should be cautious:

Antibiotics (aminoglycoside antibiotics)

Some antibiotics can affect the muscles. These antibiotics are called aminoglycoside antibiotics. Magnesium can also affect muscles. Taking aminoglycoside antibiotics and giving a magnesium injection could cause muscle problems.

Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics)

Magnesium could reduce the amount of quinolone antibiotics that the body can absorb. Taking magnesium in combination with quinolone antibiotics could reduce the effectiveness of quinolone antibiotics. To avoid this interaction, quinolone antibiotics should be taken at least two hours before or four to six hours after taking magnesium supplements.

Antibiotics (Tetracylin antibiotics)

Magnesium can bind to tetracyline antibiotics in the stomach. This reduces the amount of tetracyline antibiotics that the body can absorb. Taking magnesium in combination with tetracyline antibiotics could reduce the effectiveness of tetracyline antibiotics. To avoid this interaction, magnesium should be taken two hours before or four hours after taking tetracyline antibiotics.

Bisphosphonates

Magnesium may reduce the amount of bisphosphonates that the body absorbs. Taking magnesium in combination with bisphosphonates may decrease the effectiveness of bisphosphonates. To avoid this interaction, bisphosphonates should be taken at least two hours before magnesium or later in the day.

Medication for high blood pressure

Magnesium could lower blood pressure. Taking magnesium in combination with high blood pressure medications could result in an excessive drop in blood pressure.

Muscle relaxants

Magnesium appears to help relax muscles. Taking magnesium in combination with muscle relaxants could increase risks and side effects of muscle relaxants.

Diuretics (potassium-sparing diuretics)

Some diuretics can increase magnesium levels in the body. Taking these diuretics in combination with magnesium could result in excessively high magnesium levels in the body.

Conclusion

Getting enough magnesium is essential for maintaining good health. For this reason, you should make sure to eat plenty of magnesium-rich foods or take magnesium supplements if you are unable to meet your magnesium needs solely through food.

Without sufficient amounts of magnesium, the human body cannot function optimally.

References:

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